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Sun Protective Behaviors


SUN PROTECTIVE BEHAVIORSAn annotated bibliography (using three peer-reviewed, scientific, and published research articles) on the topic of sun-protective or sun-smart behaviors. Annotated Bibliography Diao, D. Y., & Lee, T. K. (201...Read More


~Posted on Feb 2019

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SUN PROTECTIVE BEHAVIORSAn annotated bibliography...

SUN PROTECTIVE BEHAVIORS

An annotated bibliography (using three peer-reviewed, scientific, and published research articles) on the topic of sun-protective or sun-smart behaviors.

 

Annotated Bibliography

  1. Diao, D. Y., & Lee, T. K. (2014). Sun-protective behaviors in populations at high risk for skin cancer. Psychology Research and Behavior Management7, 9–18. http://doi.org/10.2147/PRBM.S40457

The researchers elaborate that sun-protective behaviors still lag behind due to poor behavioral change in the demography at risk.

The researchers examined sun-protective behaviors in high-risk skin cancer groups.

Results indicate that increased awareness and knowledge does not necessarily translate into sun-protective behavioral change put in practice.  

Interventions should be tailored to target populations.

The research did not use numerical data for support.

The article helped me better understand the population at risk and the protective behaviors they should exercise.

  1. Hutchinson, A., Prichard, I., Ettridge, K., & Wilson, C. (2015). Skin Tone Dissatisfaction, Sun Exposure, and Sun Protection in Australian AdolescentsSpringer Link. Retrieved 6 March 2018, from https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12529-014-9441-3

The adoption of sun protection behaviors is said to be in jeopardy despite the high risk of skin cancer and is also related to skin tone dissatisfaction. Researchers aim to assess this opinion in South Australian adolescents aged between 12 and 17 years.

The research was conducted on 2,875 high school students who filled a questionnaire.

Results indicated that adoption of sun protection behaviors was low, ranging from 20 % (protective clothing) to 44 % (sunscreen use).

Skin tone dissatisfaction was a major concern for females than males and was related to increased appearance enhancement, sun protection avoidance, and increased sun exposure.

Skin tone dissatisfaction significantly influences sun related behavior of Australian adolescents. Therefore, appearance-based interventions may be useful in minimizing skin cancer risk.

The sample study involved a small group of adolescents; therefore, the study’s accuracy may be questionable.

The research article was succinct. I discovered the skin tone dissatisfaction was closely related to sun protection behaviors in Australian youths.

  1. Schofield, P., Freeman, J., Dixon, H., Borland, R., & Hill, D. (2001). Trends in sun protection behaviour among Australian young adultsWiley Online Library. Retrieved 6 March 2018, from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-842X.2001.tb00552.x/full#ss1

Sun exposure and protection behaviors continually change among young Australian males and females as they mature into adulthood. The researchers aim to establish these trends during transition from adolescent to young adulthood.

The researchers used a longitudinal design to survey the sun protection behaviors of young adults from the middle of their final year at school to around three years after they completed schooling.

Results indicated that males used less sunscreen and wore hats more frequently but reported deeper tans and higher exposure to sunlight than females. Individuals with a tanned skin were less likely to protect themselves than people with skin that burnt.

Young adulthood is a crucial time whereby deteriorating trends for sun protection during the teen years are avoided. The research lacks enough numerical data to support the statements made.

The research was concise enough. I discovered that health agencies and programs have an opportunity to tap into the trend of elevated sun-protective behaviors especially among young men during their transition from adolescence to young adulthood.

 





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