Immigration Crisis | MyPaperHub

Prior to 1920s, it was difficult or practically impossible for the country to restrict the entry of the immigrants. They included political reasons where the immigrants were viewed as potential voters for political parties. Similarly, they provided cheaper labour as compared to the natives and as such their demand rose. In essence, the national laws did not put in place the requisite mechanism to handle the pressure or technicalities of the immigration. Thus, there was little national will on the part of the state to regulate the entry of immigrants into the US. It is important to record that all these factors made it difficult for the country to restrict immigrants entry since they contributed to the political expediency of the parties and also provided labour required for positive growth.

    America as a country a raft of restrictive measures that aimed to ban immigration or illegal entry based on some demographical features. It is to say that the immigrants were barred from entering the United States of America based on their race, national origin and other misconstrued stereotypes based on demographical features of the people. In the 1920s, the government effected the Immigration Act that disallowed the Asians from entering the United States of America. The logic and argument of the Immigration Act were the primary assumptions that the Asians were dangerous and classless, and thus, they posed a great risk to the civilization of the country (FitzGerald, 2014). In retrospect, there was a blanket condemnation of all the Asians and other Europeans who otherwise would have entered America. It is to imply that the government poisoned the public mood regarding the importance of the Asians and other immigrants into the country. Instead, the laws passed were aimed at discrediting and disparaging the character and quality of the immigrants (Lee, 2006). In essence, it was viewed that they would not bring any material good to the country and as such it was needless to allow them to cross the borders of the United States of America.

    Similarly, the aftermath of the First World War triggered a national or popular revolt against the presence of the immigrants into the United States of America. The natives perceived the immigrants as disloyal since they were assumed to be lenient or sympathetic to the enemies (Reimers, 1998). It is akin to saying that the immigrants did not fully support the agility of the United States of America during the war. Thus, the country felt that there was no productive value that the foreign immigrant added to the country and as such it was necessary to ban immigration into the United Stated of America.

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